Much Ado’s Best Films of 2018 (So Far)

We may only be halfway through the year, but there have already been plenty of great movies to sink our teeth into. From slow-burn indie darlings to crowd-pleasing blockbusters, the past six months have provided something for all tastes, proving that we don’t have to be mid-awards season to experience great cinema. Check out the following 15 films that we think are the best of the best:

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You Were Never Really Here: Deconstructing a Traditional Masculine Hero

On the surface, you’ve definitely seen stories similar to You Were Never Really Here before. It follows Joe, an ex-veteran/FBI agent turned vigilante hero. His stoic masculine character trope has been explored in genre thrillers of this kind, such as Drive and most comparatively to Taxi Driver. The former a tired, male fantasy with regressive messages of masculinity and chivalric romance, the latter being an interesting study of masculinity, the main character played by De Niro going on a path to self-destruction to cope with his isolation. These movies both show a celebratory and a critical side to a masculine hero, perspectives both painted by white male directors.

What makes You Were Never Really Here a valuable addition to this canon of masculine genre thrillers, is that it becomes a character study to reveal a new kind of masculinity offered by a female director (Lynne Ramsay) that these previously mentioned films do not offer. But rather than showing a toxic male character on screen and showing his path of destruction like Scorsese did, Ramsay shows a new kind of masculine character under her own perspective. Portrayed with a career best performance by Joaquin Phoenix, Joe is a unique character to this genre because while he rescues girls sold off in human trafficking through methods of violence, but he doesn’t revel or indulge in violence. Joe suffers with a life of trauma and seeks heroism to cope with his psychological wounds, and learns what greater responsibility means through his experiences.

SPOILER WARNING

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Must See Films at Istanbul International Film Festival ‘18

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Turkey’s biggest film festival, the Istanbul International Film Festival is here! The festival takes place between 6th to 16th of April all over Istanbul with screenings of the latest films from Turkish and World cinema, events and a celebration of Ingmar Bergman’s 100th birthday. Whilst we’ll be all over the town to see three films a day, we’ve gathered our 8 must see films at the festival for you!

  • Disobedience

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From the director of “A Fantastic Woman”, this year’s Best Foreign Film at the Academy Awards, Sebastian Lelio, “Disobedience” tells the story of a woman who returns to her Jewish community years after being shunned for her same sex attraction to a childhood friend and how their passion reignites after meeting each other once again. Starring Rachel McAdams and Rachel Weisz, the film received good reception at TIFF where it premiered. “Disobedience” is already one of the most anticipated films of the year for its stellar performances and its subject matter. It’ll premiere as one of the films of Vodafone’s Red Galas at the festival.

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You Were Never Really Here Review – Living with Pain

Trauma can be unbearable.

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Joe has been trough a lot and his life is not exactly what you would call relaxed in any sense of the word. He is some sort of enforcer, his jobs eventually all leading to a point where his fist (or his hammer) will smash someone’s face in. One day he is assigned to retrieve a young girl from a sex trafficking ring, a job that disrupts his routine and thus his life, which palpably (and solely?) rests on latter.

This is not a completely new narrative at first glance, but it shows once again that cinema often finds its essence and its highs in the ‘how’ and not in the ‘what’. Not to say that this movie hasn’t got a brilliant story to tell, in the contrary – the narrative heights it reaches, affected me much more than I expected. But scottish indie darling Lynne Ramsay outdoes herself specifically from a directorial perspective, by creating a staggering crescendo of audiovisual composition, downright pressing the viewer further onto his seat with each passing minute and absorbing him on a level that is only achievable by a master of the cinematic language.

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