‘Doozy’ Successfully De-mystifies the Queer-Coded Villain

The campy villain is undoubtedly one of the biggest staples of traditional animation; this trope runs through film and television alike, regardless of audience and story. From The Lion King to The Powerpuff Girls, Gravity Falls to Wreck-it-Ralph, the comedically limp-wristed bad guy is an intrinsic part of American society’s casually homophobic output, setting up an environment where these behaviours are automatically associated with social ills. 

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The historical context of this stereotype is explored in Richard Squire’s documentary ‘Doozy’, through the example of comedian and voice actor Paul Lynde (1926-1982). Lynde, otherwise known for roles in Bewitched and Bye-Bye-Birdie, is fondly remembered as the voice of various ‘campy villains’ across four Hanna-Barbera productions – Charlotte’s Web, It’s the Wolf, Where’s Huddles? and The Perils of Penelope Pitstop. Squires utilises a combination of interviews, animated re-enactments, and talking heads to trace Lynde’s life in relation to the stereotype he so brilliantly portrayed, with ample consideration for the personal and professional impact this may have had on him as an individual. 

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