Female Director Spotlight: Angela Robinson is an inspiration to lesbians everywhere

If you’re into lesbian cinema, then you’ve probably heard of Angela Robinson. Her profile has recently expanded; long after blessing us with the likes of D.E.B.S. and Girltrash!, the writer-director went mainstream last year with her vastly under-appreciated Professor Marston and the Wonder Women. (You can read our LFF review of the film here.)

At Much Ado About Cinema, we cherish LGBTQ+ film, and queer cinema is a core foundation of our lives. Robinson is an example of a filmmaker who constantly centres lesbian/bisexual women in her stories, and produces these stories in a way that often makes us feel validated and genuinely represented – she is a brilliant example of why LGBT stories are told best by LGBT people. Whether it’s through comedic parodies or psychosexual dramas, we’ll be following Robinson’s career wherever she chooses to go. If you’re new to her work, take a gander at the profile below: you’ve got a whole lot to catch up on.

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Films Directed by Women in 2017 that You Might’ve Missed (Part 1)

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2017 was a year full of the celebration of female filmmakers. Patty Jenkins brought Wonder Woman to the big screen and proved to those still in doubt that women can make blockbusters! (Wow, can you believe?!) Dee ReesMudbound and Greta Gerwig‘s Lady Bird were nominated for Academy Awards! So to celebrate female filmmakers and Women’s History Month we’ll share with you some films that were directed by women that you might’ve missed. To not overwhelm you with all these great films, we’ll share them throughout the month! In honour of International Women’s Day, here is the first piece, we hope you enjoy and watch them all!

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BFI London Film Festival ’17 Review: ‘Professor Marston and the Wonder Women’ is a character-driven, psychosexual drama that seriously deserves your attention

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Polyamory is not a subject that is often tackled within fiction – much less in a way that portrays such a relationship as a multifaceted romance, rather than voyeuristic soft porn. ‘Professor Marston and the Wonder Women’, therefore, already excels from the offset purely due to its unique subject matter and the respectful tone in which this is addressed. The semi-biographical story follows American psychologist William Moulton Marston (played by Luke Evans), and his relationships with the two women who inspired his beloved creation: Wonder Woman. It is an exploration of the psychology of domination, submission, and sexual dynamics – but ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ this is not. Instead, ‘Professor Marston’ incorporates psychosexual themes into a fully rounded human story about power, love, and societal pressure to conform. Though the film brims with sexuality, the tastefully directed sex scenes are never exploitative of the queer love which the film represents.

Continue reading “BFI London Film Festival ’17 Review: ‘Professor Marston and the Wonder Women’ is a character-driven, psychosexual drama that seriously deserves your attention”