MUBI Review: ‘Berberian Sound Studio’ and The Power of Sound

This review is part of our coverage for MUBI’s August 2019 slate.

“Which reel?”

“Forget the reel. I just need to scream. That’s all.”

There is no denial that Peter Strickland is emerging as one of the strongest contemporary genre filmmakers of the UK. With the kaleidoscopic The Duke of Burgundy and his most recent In Fabric, he displays his talent for something that one usually connects with the great genre filmmakers of the likes of Argento, De Palma and co., whose influence he wears proudly. Strickland has the sensibility to craft a thoroughly entertaining film that specifically concentrates on its aesthetic ideas and weaves them into central narrative concerns without running into danger of being gimmicky.

While In Fabric is fascinated with the image of a cursed piece of cloth on an elegant shop counter, and Duke of Burgundy with a submissive maid dusting off the glass of a butterfly collection, Strickland’s breakout film Berberian Sound Studio is invested into the texture of sound technology and the image of a woman screaming in silence.

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MUBI Review: ‘The Duke of Burgundy’ and the Theatrics of Love

This review is part of our coverage for MUBI’s August’ 19 slate.

Focalised through the slowly waning romantic affair between two women, director Peter Strickland’s The Duke of Burgundy (2014) is an intriguing examination of the theatrics of love. The film occupies an alternate plane of reality altogether — temporal markers are removed, only women exist, and all everyone ever does is attend lectures on butterflies or customise beds for those interested in S&M. Perhaps the almost surreal setting of Strickland’s film is a fitting match for the isolated romance at hand, which borders on consumingly solipsistic.⁠

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