Under the Radar Picks from BFI London Film Festival ’18

The 62nd BFI London Film Festival ended just under a week ago, but many films from the festival’s expansive lineup are still lingering on our minds. We loved the buzz-worthy titles including The FavouriteBeautiful Boy and Rafikibut we also caught a few gems hidden in the mix. Iana and Megan make their picks from the lesser known films from the festival.

Continue reading “Under the Radar Picks from BFI London Film Festival ’18”

BFI London Film Festival ’18: ‘Assassination Nation’ Is A Liberal Feminist’s Wet Dream

The lives of teenage girls are increasingly entangled with various forms of violence. Whether it be through the sinister undercurrents of body shaming amplified by the internet, the very literal brutality at the hands of boys and men, or the obsessive hatred of their typical interests by the media, young women have a lot to struggle with as they grow up. Directed by Sam Levinson in only his second directorial output, Assassination Nation takes this theoretical violence and manifests it in a gory, stylised take on the revenge of a generation bombarded with gendered hate. 

mv5bmtc0ndg2ody5n15bml5banbnxkftztgwodi2ndmynjm-_v1_sx1777_cr001777744_al_.jpg

Lily (Odessa Young) is a high schooler obsessed with so-called ‘selfie culture’. Her life revolves around the attention she gains both from her teenage boyfriend Mark, and from the grown man she calls ‘Daddy’ behind Mark’s back. Her best friend, Bex (Hari Nef) has her own relationship issues; the boy she likes is insisting they keep their sexual relationship private due to the fact that Bex is transgender. Together with Em (Abra) and Sarah (Suki Waterhouse), the girls form a refreshingly diverse and positive friendship group in a world where teenage girls are expected to view each other as competition for male attention.

Continue reading “BFI London Film Festival ’18: ‘Assassination Nation’ Is A Liberal Feminist’s Wet Dream”

BFI London Film Festival ’18: ‘The Favourite’ Makes Scathing Commentary on the Frivolity of Royalty (Also, There’s Lesbian Activity)

It starts with a whisper, then a murmur, then a joyous shout. Spreading across the screening like waves disturbing still water, the chanting begins. Sapphics hold hands as they begin to activate their power, absorbing gay energy from the very presence of Rachel Weisz in a hunting outfit. They will now live forever, to spread a message of plaid and emotional detachment across the world.

“Let’s go lesbians,” yells the theatre, and all heterosexuality evaporates into dust.

I’m joking, of course, but that’s kinda what watching The Favourite felt like.

Continue reading “BFI London Film Festival ’18: ‘The Favourite’ Makes Scathing Commentary on the Frivolity of Royalty (Also, There’s Lesbian Activity)”

BFI London Film Festival ’18: ‘Beautiful Boy’ Devastates with Bitter Truths about Addiction

Films about addiction are tough. They cut deep and are severe to the point of exploitation, and they’re never as raw or honest as Felix Van Groeningen’s Beautiful Boy. This is an addiction story, but above that, it’s a story about family and the unconditional love borne from such a special, formidable bond. 

Based on David and Nic Sheff’s respective memoirs, Beautiful Boy and Tweak, the film depicts their family’s struggle with methamphetamine addiction. Nic (Timothée Chalamet) is the addict, and David (Steve Carell) is the father trying to save him. This two-hander lends an added openness to confronting America’s crisis: addiction affects not only the user, but everyone around them. It doesn’t attempt to solve the crisis either, because it knows all too well that the road to recovery is long and treacherous.

beautiful-boy-1

Continue reading “BFI London Film Festival ’18: ‘Beautiful Boy’ Devastates with Bitter Truths about Addiction”

BFI London Film Festival ’18 Review: Despite a Strong Lead Performance, ‘Destroyer’ Fails To Make an Impact

Women on screen are so rarely allowed to be bad people. Redeemable qualities must be injected into even the most abhorrent of female characters, and this is only amplified when the character in question is a mother. Neglect of a child is a role that any fictional father may take up, but as a woman, the mother must ultimately soften even when her dedication is in doubt.

mv5bmtcxnjc2nta0nf5bml5banbnxkftztgwnty3ndy1njm-_v1_sx1777_cr001777729_al_.jpg

Destroyer avoids these pitfalls in its depiction of detective Erin Bell (Nicole Kidman), a grizzled LAPD cop with a dark past and a difficult nature. Bell, in all aspects but her gender, is the stereotypical protagonist of every police procedural ever created. She has an awful relationship with her family, works alone wherever possible, and goes off the books to the dismay of her superiors — but through it all, she is exceptionally talented at what she does. It is fantastic, from a representation perspective, to see this familiar trope be transported into the body of an older woman, with all the wrinkles and blemished skin that comes with aging. Kidman is reliably incredible within the role, as piercing and intimidating as any lone wolf officer should be. Here we have a woman over the age of fifty, who is so often dismissed by the media, take centre stage — and she is permitted to be irredeemable.  

Continue reading “BFI London Film Festival ’18 Review: Despite a Strong Lead Performance, ‘Destroyer’ Fails To Make an Impact”

BFI London Film Festival ’18 Review: ‘Rafiki’ is a Beautiful Study of Dual Identity

Rafiki is a film that will go down in history. Wanuri Kahiu, in creating a Kenyan film unafraid to portray lesbian sexuality, not only succeeded in winning over the international festival circuit, but also faced down a tough legal battle in her home country. Victorious, Kahiu was permitted to show the film for one week in Kenya (where homosexuality is illegal) so that Rafiki may qualify for Oscar submission — a week that was undoubtedly revolutionary for the Kenyan lesbian community.

mv5bzdzmodblmmmtngjmnc00ndawltg3mjktoti0ztq5nzy0zte3xkeyxkfqcgdeqxvynjg2nzuzmde-_v1_.jpg

Subversive in its very existence, Rafiki’s profound impact is twofold: as a love story, the film crafts a study of forbidden lesbian intimacy unlike any other. Never voyeuristic, Kahiu’s camera traces the bodies of her characters as they touch, following the movements of hands upon skin with breathtaking detail. The absence of what we would typically consider as nudity only strengthens the clandestine, almost wistful nature of Kena and Ziki’s relationship — we are outsiders to their unique bond, and their bodies are not ours to consume. Rather, it is their affection for each other that we witness, and what a beautiful affection it is. The pair is endlessly supportive of each other regardless of the circumstance. When Kena explains her wish to become a nurse, Ziki pushes her —why not a doctor? Kena doesn’t think she’ll get the grades, but Ziki believes in her fully. There is no selfishness between them, and in this sense, they function almost like a friendship, as reflected in the title: “Rafiki” means “Friend” in Swahili.  Continue reading “BFI London Film Festival ’18 Review: ‘Rafiki’ is a Beautiful Study of Dual Identity”

BFI London Film Festival ’18 Review: ‘Lizzie’ Makes Lesbian Axe-Murderers Seem Boring

An unsolved mystery, especially one as peculiar as the case of the Lizzie Borden murders, should be like gold dust for filmmakers looking to tap into a ready-made audience. The chance to portray a real story that has peaked our communal curiosity for over a hundred years provides an opportunity to update those old tales for a new, fresher audience, and dare to make judgements through the interpretive lens of a camera. With a wealth of grisly information on the aftermath (Mr. Borden was struck 18 times with an axe; his wife 17), here is the perfect circumstance for an artist to create something devastatingly haunting from a story so deeply embedded in American popular culture. Lizzie promises all of this but never delivers, presenting us instead with a bare-bones carcass of a biopic that is stripped of all individuality, charm, or character.

MV5BMjE5MTMyMTQ0OF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNjY2ODQwNjM@._V1_SX1777_CR0,0,1777,740_AL_

Continue reading “BFI London Film Festival ’18 Review: ‘Lizzie’ Makes Lesbian Axe-Murderers Seem Boring”