Best Films of 2018

2018 has been a wild year for film, from wildly entertaining sequels (see Mamma Mia: Here We Go Again and Paddington 2) to Yorgos Lanthimos’ latest in dry, yet tragic, humor to a horror film featuring tongue clicking, a nut allergy, and dead pigeons. It has been year for powerful women, both in front of and behind the camera, from the women of Annihilation to Crystal Moselle and her look into the world of women skateboarders. It has been a year to interrogate representations of masculinity, from Joe in You Were Never Really Here to Reverend Toller in First Reformed. It has been a year of terror, love, laughter, and exhaustion, both literally and cinematically. The films of 2018 truly captured the strange and turbulent atmosphere that has thrown us all into a state of near-constant anxiety.

The Much Ado team has relished in this anxiety, seeing many of 2018’s best, and worst films with the help of film festivals such as Cannes, NYFF, and BFI, MoviePass (RIP), and AMC Stubs A-List. After much deliberation, Letterboxd rankings, and last-minute trips to the cinema, we present Much Ado’s top 25 films of the year.

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Much Ado’s Best Films of 2018 (So Far)

We may only be halfway through the year, but there have already been plenty of great movies to sink our teeth into. From slow-burn indie darlings to crowd-pleasing blockbusters, the past six months have provided something for all tastes, proving that we don’t have to be mid-awards season to experience great cinema. Check out the following 15 films that we think are the best of the best:

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Glasgow Film Festival ’18: It’s one boy and his horse against the world in ‘Lean on Pete’

Rarely have films ever made me cry for two hours straight, but Lean on Pete arrives like a stampede to join that very short list. I saw Lean on Pete last year at London Film Festival and director Andrew Haigh was at the screening for a Q&A. The very first question (or statement rather) was from a woman who did nothing but berate the film for its representation of America. I was seething — did we even watch the same film? Lean on Pete is devastating. It’s a sensitive portrayal of lower-class America with a heartbreaking performance from Charlie Plummer. Andrew Haigh’s films always destroy me, and this one is no different.

Lean on Pete is the horse in question, a racehorse long past its prime and destined to be sold for slaughter. The only thing standing in the way however is 16-year-old Charley (Charlie Plummer) who refuses to let this horse die. Charley is working for Del (Steve Buscemi), also past his prime and exasperated with the world of horses, he passes on his wisdom to naive little Charley while providing odd jobs. Pete’s rider is Bonnie (Chloë Sevigny), a cynical jockey on the verge of giving it up altogether. “There are only so many times you can fall off a horse and get up,” she says. Her reminders that Lean on Pete is just a horse, not a pet, fall on deaf ears — in a world where Charley has no one (his mother abandoned him and his father is largely absent, much preferring to jump from girlfriend to girlfriend) Pete is his one loyal friend.

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Charlie Plummer in ‘Lean on Pete’ © Curzon/A24

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