‘Sharp Objects’ Recap: Dirt

TW: SELF-HARM, ALCOHOLISM

As episode one ended with Natalie Keene’s death, episode two begins with her funeral. Here, Camille must finally show her face to the whole town in quite a public way, all while trying to report this story. We begin to see Camille battling memories and anxieties, not just associated with her mother, but with returning home to a town full of secrets and whispers. Episode two explores the toxicity and gossip of Wind Gap, the anxieties that arise when coming home and the destructive ways we cope with those anxieties.

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As Camille sits at the funeral, Jackie mutters a stream of gossip right into Camille’s ear, pointing out who is who in the family, remarking about Natalie’s brother crying too much, and more. Not even funerals are sacred in this town — in fact, this just throws more fuel on the gossip fire. The gossip only continues at the funeral reception in the Keene home. The whispers are amplified when Camille arrives, making you painfully aware that people are talking about her. It echoes the experience of returning home so well: you enter a crowded house, pretend to smile, but have a heightened sense of awareness as people stare too long or whisper behind their glasses. How does Camille cope? The drink, of course.

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‘Sharp Objects’ Recap: ‘Vanish’

TW: SELF-HARM, ALCOHOLISM

Any project that includes Amy Adams rightfully garners great attention, but this time, audiences can be graced with the actress’s talent in their homes each week in HBO’s latest limited series, Sharp Objects. Based on Gillian Flynn’s novel of the same name, the premiere follows Camille Preaker, a reporter based in St. Louis, as her boss sends her back to her hometown of Wind Gap to cover the investigation of a murdered girl and a missing girl. Starting the first scene of the series with Camille being awakened by her younger self sets the haunting tone. Before we are introduced to the protagonist, it’s made known that she has demons that follow her, even in events that are supposed to be peaceful. Her editor obviously cares for her and believes this assignment will be good for the newspaper and Camille — personally and professionally. For Camille, however, it seems like a grave choice to return home and be reunited with her mother. She plays her music through her cracked phone — alluding to the show’s title — heavily drinks vodka throughout the day in a deceiving water bottle, and doesn’t interact much with other people. She’s broken — for unknown reasons as of yet — and she seems to accept this as her dark reality.

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In Shogun World, ‘Westworld’s’ Female Characters Must Suffer to Be Strong

Episode five of Westworld picks up from episode three’s cliffhanger where a mysterious man wielding a katana charges at Maeve. Enter Shogun World–this is the park where guests come when they find Westworld too tame, a concept which emphasizes guests’ desire for a stereotypically “exotic” experience. In an entertaining and cinematic episode, writer Dan Dietz and director Craig Zobel play with the nostalgia of Westerns and samurai films. While it featured stellar performances from Rinko Kikuchi and Thandie Newton, this episode shows how Westworld continues to subject its female characters to trauma to prove their strength.

When Maeve and company enter Shogun World, writer Lee Sizemore (Simon Quarterman) reveals that, in an effort to write as many stories as possible, he took their Westworld storylines and gave them a stereotypical Japanese twist to make it “new.” It is fascinating to watch these “doppelbots” recognize each other, particularly Maeve and the geisha, Akane (Kikuchi). They’re both sex workers, seen as pieces of meat to hosts and guests alike; they want to protect their own (Maeve and her daughter, Akane and Sakura, a young geisha); they both must suffer to grow.  

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Maeve discovers she can now mentally control other hosts. But, this new ability only comes after being beaten and choked by a ninja. As she gasps her last breaths and her eyes roll back into her head, Maeve realizes she can stop her assailant, even when she can no longer speak. Her suffering to gain this new ability is only one example in this episode of female characters needing to experience trauma to prove their strength.

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Episode Three of ‘Westworld’ Begs the Question: Who Let the Tiger Out?

We aren’t in the wild west anymore, folks. Episode three of ‘Westworld,’ ‘Virtù e Fortuna,’ has finally confirmed the existence of not one, but two new theme parks: the Raj (British-occupied colonial India) and Shogun World (samurais). Dissent is spreading to the other parks and the hosts have taken control; plus, there are rogue tigers chasing guests.

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Episode three opens in the Raj, where guests sip tea and plan their hunting expeditions, while Indian men serve them. It’s a place for the rich to live out their Victorian fantasies of experiencing the exotic, while still in the comfort of a luxurious resort. In this resort, two strangers meet, engage in some interesting foreplay, then go off into the jungle together to hunt tigers. But subsequently are hunted by a host who declares, “these violent delights have violent ends” as he pulls the trigger. The man is shot and the woman escapes, only to run into the jungle and encounter a tiger.

Then, in a scene that is distinctly J.J. Abrams, a tiger knocks this mysterious woman off a cliff. Don’t worry, she survives somehow. She seems to have a part to play in all of this, but within a narrative so full of characters and storylines already, it’s hard to be excited about someone new.  

While tigers are attacking guests, Dolores (Evan Rachel Wood) has started a war. She sacrifices her new Confederado allies, armed with Civil War-era muskets, to the heavily armed human park security. In an uninspired battle where the massacre of hosts doesn’t seem much different from previous episodes, Dolores asserts herself as superior to other hosts–hosts that have not yet been awakened. She declares, “These men are just children. They don’t know any better. They need to be led.” She has become self-important and rather than feel inspired or moved by her monologues, I found myself bored.

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A character who finally had a shining moment was Teddy, played by James Marsden. So far this season he has been as memorable as a piece of plain white toast. But in this episode, Teddy’s discomfort with Dolores’ violence is no longer just a puppy-eyed grimace. This time, he disobeys Dolores and releases a group of hosts instead of executing them. There may be a glimmer of hope for that piece of white toast after all.

As Dolores continues to act poetic about her new role in this world and her grand plans, I find myself wishing for more scenes with Maeve. There are no dramatic monologues or too-sincere declarations, there is only her daughter. Maeve is smart, strategic, calculating, but also loving. She holds Hector’s (Rodrigo Santoro) hand, much to the surprise of their human hostage and park writer, Lee Sizemore (Simon Quartermain). That violates the narratives which were written for them; they are breaking the rules. Hector is supposed to be linked to the host, Isabella, not Maeve.

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But despite breaking some rules, Hector still echoes back cheesy romantic lines that Sizemore has written for him. Are these hosts really freethinking? If not, what happens when they truly break free from these narratives?

We also learn that Sizemore wrote Hector and Isabella after a breakup. Specifically, he wrote a narrative where Isabella, who represents his ex-girlfriend, is killed off as a perverse form of revenge. Sizemore’s anecdote illustrates the show’s problem with excessive violence towards women as a form of unwarranted punishment. Yes, ‘Westworld’ is violent and seems to spare no one, but there is a particular focus on trauma and violence towards women.

Episode three ultimately introduces plenty of new parks and new characters, but few answers. The storylines continue to multiply and branch off with no end in sight. As the story continues to expand beyond the scope of Westworld, it’s starting to become too big to contain. The season may only be three episodes in, but I’m exhausted thinking about what the rest of the season could bring.

Review: In ‘Westworld’ Season 2, Robot Women Will Inherit the Earth

As ‘Westworld’ season two begins, and the first notes of Ramin Djawadi’s score are played, we see the credit sequence. Still familiar, but some things have changed. Instead of seeing two hosts having sex, there is a mother holding her baby; instead of machines creating a horse, a bison is smashing through glass; instead of an eye being created, it is being destroyed. This is no longer a show about pleasure and fantasy–it’s about death and rebirth. The senseless slaughter of hosts at the hands of humanity seemed without consequence. But now, it’s time to pay in blood.

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Thandie Newton as Maeve in ‘Westworld’ © 2018 HBO

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