VIDEO: Game of Thrones, A Farewell

It’s the end of an era. Game of Thrones ended this week, and while the finale didn’t live up to our expectations, it’s still sad to see it go. To honor this show and everything it has made us feel in this last decade, Lucy (@iconicaesthetic) commemorated the show with an amazing supercut that will remind you why you’ve loved visiting Westeros every weekend it in the first place.

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Podcast Game of Thrones Special #5

End of an era is here and we’re celebrating with a special podcast! For the last season of Game of Thrones, we’re going to have a podcast after each episode.

After a brief hiatus, the Much Ado Game of Thrones coverage is back! In this episode, Editor in Chief Dilara Elbir talks with our very own video editor Lucy May about the penultimate episode of the final season “The Bells.” We have a lot of opinions about the very controversial episode, and about how they treated one of the co-founders of Much Ado: Cersei Lannister.

Spoilers lie ahead, so beware! Listen now on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, and anywhere else you can find your podcasts!

 

On our Patreon page, we set a goal of $75 to start working on our podcast and four months ago we hit that goal, thanks to your help! Every time we gain a new Patron, we come one step closer to saving enough money to pay to our writers. You can help us with as little as $1.

Podcast Game of Thrones Special #2

End of an era is here and we’re celebrating with a special podcast! For the last season of Game of Thrones, we’re going to have a podcast after each episode.

For the second episode “A Knight of Seven Kingdoms”, Dilara Elbir speaks with Senior Editor Megan Christopher about the calm before the storm, the great Brienne moment, Tormund’s adventures with giant’s milk, Sansa’s power moves and theories about which characters we’re losing in next episode.

Be aware of the spoilers and enjoy! Available on iTunesSpotifyGoogle PlayStitcher, and anywhere else you access your podcasts!

On our Patreon page, we set a goal of $75 to start working on our podcast and four months ago we hit that goal, thanks to your help! Every time we gain a new Patron, we come one step closer to saving enough money to pay to our writers. You can help us with as little as $1.

Podcast Game of Thrones Special #1

End of an era is here and we’re celebrating with a special podcast! For the last season of Game of Thrones, we’re going to have a podcast episode after each episode. For the first episode “Winterfell”, Dilara Elbir speaks with Little White Lies’ associate editor Hannah Woodhead about how it feels to watch the last season as longtime fans, expectations for the first episode and CGI dragon watching everyone’s favourite Nephew/Aunt pair make-out. Be aware of the spoilers and enjoy!

Available on iTunesSpotifyGoogle PlayStitcher, and anywhere else you access your podcasts!

On our Patreon page, we set a goal of $75 to start working on our podcast and four months ago we hit that goal, thanks to your help! Every time we gain a new Patron, we come one step closer to saving enough money to pay to our writers. You can help us with as little as $1.

The New Age of 21st Century Television: The Good, The Bad & The Weird

* This piece is written as the first part of an ongoing series, “The New Age of 21st Century Television: The Good, The Bad & The Weird”, which will talk about the ongoing transition happening on both little & big screens, and the various factors causing that said transition.

* This piece involves spoilers for the series Lost, Gossip Girl, Glee, Game of Thrones; speculations for Game of Thrones & A Song of Ice and Fire Book Series.

Screen Shot 2017-12-17 at 12.43.35 AM
Source unknown. No copyright gain intended.

The television — not the actual product that is television, but rather the television as in the programs and series presented in a way known for that said product, of course — is living its golden moment right now. Sure, the viewing percentages might be much lower than what they used to be during the nineties, where there was nothing else to do during a week-night if you weren’t living the lifes shown in, you guessed it, the television: even Game of Thrones, which is undoubtedly today’s biggest TV series when it comes to popularity, isn’t able get the numbers that is needed to crack into the top ten list of the most watched television episodes, which finds its lowest point in Home Improvement’s 35.5 million in 1999 and highest in M*A*S*H’s reported 105.9 million viewers of 1983. The newest entry to that list is 2004’s Friends finale episode “The Last One”, which earned its place in number four thanks to 52.5 million people gathering up to watch it. Game of Thrones, with its ever-expanding viewership on each new episode, has the chance of rise above The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air (19.9 million) or maybe Full House (24.3 million) one day, but even that seems like a stretch. But this doesn’t mean that people are not watching television anymore, it just means that they’re not watching it on the actual television.

Continue reading “The New Age of 21st Century Television: The Good, The Bad & The Weird”

2017: A Television Year in Review

Here at Much Ado About Cinema, the focus tends to be on films – which is great, but that’s not all cinema amounts to. 2017 was also a great year for television, and there’s a lot of arguments to be made concerning the prestige of the format; with the popularity of netflix and the prominence of many highly-regarded directors flocking to the small screen, television is experiencing something of a resurgence in reputability. With this in mind, Much Ado will be incorporating more coverage of the medium as we head into 2018, and we thought we would begin with a look back on our favourite shows of 2017, from the surprising, to the disappointing, to the consistently brilliant.

 

American Gods

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American Gods. © 2017 Fremantle Media North America

To most, American Gods might seem no different than many other fantasy series that are on cable TV, or even the network: it has cool visuals, is based on a book series, and written in hopes of captivating its viewers via carefully crafted plot twists. Built on the already complex premise of Neil Gaiman’s book of the same name, creator Bryan Fuller and his team of writers manage to succesfully carry a transition between two mediums of storytelling by doing that one wouldn’t expect from such a genre, and focusing on the people that  fantasy world rather than what makes the world a fantasy one. Of course, the fact that people are mostly the main reason that this world is magic does provide help on this subject to them, but even the visual work here is always about what it tells of instead of what it might show. Fuller might be best known for his visual perfection of Hannibal, but his work here can be even argued to exceed that. Eight episodes, each not longer than an hour, work as book chapters of their own — and they all have their own prologues in most cases, little, thematically coherent cold openings that tell smaller stories with little to no consequence, but are still able to create an impactful parallel with the bigger picture. When looked from afar, American Gods is a masterpiece of filmmaking and production — and that might even be enough for it to be considered as one of the best outings of the year: but the real present opens itself up when one begins to examine the work closely, and finds themselves in a labyrinth of significant questions abot love, life, belief and fate.

– Deniz Çakır

Continue reading “2017: A Television Year in Review”