MUBI Review: ‘The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie’ and Surrealist Commentary

As of today, the Amazon Rainforest is on fire, fascist rhetoric seems normalized, and I’m seeing videos of protestors across the seas and in my own country being beaten and oppressed. The world is unfair, cruel, and traumatic; and we are left to figure it out. It is especially infuriating when it seems those with the power to change the world turn a deaf ear to those fighting for justice.

Of course, this push and pull between the haves and have nots is nothing new. Often, analyzing how others have spoken out against injustice puts our anger in a comforting context. Luis Buñel had many of the frustrations that we have today, albeit in a different situation to say the least. In a strange twist of fate and fortune, we have the luxury to analyze his surrealist commentary in one of the seminal works of his career, The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoise. 

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‘Special’ is a Delightful and Nuanced New Slam-Dunk by Netflix

When scrolling through Netflix’s recent catalogue, it’s gratifying to see a lot of content focusing on under-represented minorities, especially in genres that are commonly concentrated on white, straight stories of privilege. While some, such as Pose and Everything Sucks!, manage to establish effective narratives of inclusion, others, such as Insatiable, fail miserably and feed into dangerous prejudice. It’s a relief that Special – the world’s first dramedy series about a young gay man with cerebral palsy – is not only respectful towards its subject, but also conscious of other struggles surrounding him.

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Podcast #5: Music in Film

The fifth episode of the Much Ado About Cinema Podcast has arrived!

On our Patreon page, we set a goal of $75 to start working on our podcast and four months ago we hit that goal, thanks to your help! Every time we gain a new Patron, we come one step closer to saving enough money to pay to our writers. You can help us with as little as $1.

In this episode, I talk to writers Mia Vicino, Kareem Baholzer, and Hannah Ryan about our favorite uses of music in film. To keep the conversation tidy, we limited it to non-original, non-score music. It was a lot of fun to put together, we hope you enjoy!

Available on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, Stitcher, and anywhere else you access your podcasts!

“I’m Not Willing to Accept the Official Narrative Anymore” — An Interview with ‘Flatland’ Director Jenna Bass

A Western-stye tale of female empowerment that sees two women, Natalie (Nicole Fortuin) and Poppie (Izel Bzuidenhout) ride across the South African Karoo in search of adventure and self-fulfillment, Flatland was chosen to open the Berlinale Panorama Section. We talked to director Jenna Bass all about her landmark feminist film.

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“I Wanted to Reflect How Suffocating Gender Norms Can Be” — An Interview With ‘Normal’ Director Adele Tulli

Italian documentaries had a field day at Berlinale this year. Whether it was the innovative Selfie, allowing its subjects to become the cameramen themselves, or the harrowing depiction of Cosa Nostra brutality in Shooting The Mafia, the Southern European country asked hard questions of its society this year. The standout was Normal, the latest documentary from Adele Tulli, which takes a fresh and innovative look at gender stereotypes. Allowing its images — whether it’s boys riding motorbikes, or girls dressing up as princesses, or mothers exercising in the park — to truly speak for themselves, Tulli pushes the absurdity of fixed gender norms to their very limit. We sat down with her to discuss her unique documentary.

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‘Mortal Engines’ Slaps — But No One Wants to See It

It feels as something has been missing from big studio films in recent memory, at least when you ask general audiences. The kind of archaic, action-heavy and pathos-ridden blockbusters that usually draw many to the theatre, seem to have lost their appeal. In the exact moment where the cinema as an institution has gained a major rival in the form of streaming services, the films that usually gel so well on the big screen, with their opulent production design and their often CG-supported visual grandeur, seem have lost contact to their potential audiences, no matter how visually inventive or audacious they are. Some of these films get a push in the case of a positive critical reception or massive marketing campaigns, but in general, new franchises are hit hard at the box office. Recent examples are plenty and to be fair, many of these films are forgettable. But even films that truly stand out have to take major losses in their cinema runs.

One example is Doug Liman’s Edge of Tomorrow (2014), an action film with a star-studded cast, a talented crew and stellar reviews. It concisely mixed genre conventions into big entertainment — but despite the quality on display and the accessibility in the film’s storytelling, the general public wasn’t interested in seeing it. And while they didn’t get away with a positive critic’s consensus, flopped films such as the Wachowskis’ Jupiter Ascending (2015) and Luc Besson’s Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets (2017) have gained a community of fans, who admire them for their courage to be original in their vision of spectacle and who prevent their names from being forgotten in the flash flood of the contemporary blockbuster landscape. It’s a slightly different story with Mortal Engines — but not all too different.

mortal-engines-movie-screencaps-screenshots-3Mortal Engines (2018) – directed by Christian Rivers, all right reserved to © Universal Pictures

The base setup of the film is one that seems to be, in theory, a safe bet: produced and co-written by Peter Jackson, who used to be the biggest name of the industry in relation to the type of filmmaking in question, Mortal Engines somehow managed to completely bomb at the box office. It is actually quite a shame, because the film keeps its promise of – big – and manages to possess much more vigor and excitement than the average blockbuster film.

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“I’m Not Interested in Successful People” — An Interview with ‘Jumpman’ Director Ivan I. Tverdovsky

This interview was done by our guest writer, Redmond Bacon.

Jumpman, the latest film by Ivan I. Tverdovsky, concerns an orphaned boy who suffers from congenital analgesia – meaning that he feels no pain. One day his estranged mother picks him up from the orphanage and together they run a blackmailing scheme whereby he jumps in front of cars and blackmails their owners for money. Set in and around Moscow, it’s a seething indictment of corruption in contemporary Russian society. The third film from the young director shows him in total command of his style, which deploys long takes to fully immerse us into the lives of its characters. Soundtracked by artists such as ЛУНА, and set in popular Moscow locales such as Squat 3/4 club, it maintains a contemporary feel, giving it a strong chance of connecting with young viewers in Russia today.

The movie celebrated its premiere in the competition slot of the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival. I sat down with the director to talk about his inspiration for the film, his attraction to characters who are outsiders, and the significance of national symbols.

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