Chicago ’18 Review: In ‘Olympia’ There’s No Cutoff For Trying to Get Your Life Together

We all hate growing up: paying bills, paying rent, paying taxes, getting a job. It feels like a constant struggle to figure it all out while you’re just trying to keep your head above water and seem put together. It is a feeling that may seem difficult to convey, but Chicago-born screenwriter McKenize Chinn is able to do it in her film, Olympia. This film captures the anxieties and fears of trying to get your proverbial shit together while staying true to your dreams.

Olympia is about Chicago-native Olympia (Chinn) who is trying to figure it all out on the eve of her 30th birthday. She is a talented artist, but hasn’t been able to use it to make a living — instead, she is a receptionist at a nondescript office, doing menial work that’ll pay the bills. She has a wonderful, and recently successful, boyfriend, a loving sister, and a sick mother. She is insular, shut off from the world, and scared of telling anyone how she is truly feeling — she doesn’t want to seem weak or incompetent. Olympia is stuck at a crossroads and is trying to figure out what it really means to be an adult. She learns being an adult is messy, complicated, hard, beautiful, and no one really ever has it figured out. Continue reading “Chicago ’18 Review: In ‘Olympia’ There’s No Cutoff For Trying to Get Your Life Together”

Chicago ‘18 Review: Get Lost in the Violence and Music of ‘Vox Lux’

Is there anything more satisfying than a catchy pop tune you can’t get out of your head? A tune that pounds its way into the crevices of your brain and infiltrates your every thought? Many times these songs enter our consciousness with little regard to who wrote, who sung it, and how it came to be a hit. But, Brady Corbet’s film, Vox Lux, forces the audience to confront the sinister undertones of pop and its relationship to the spectacle of violence.

Vox Lux is presented in two parts that are defined by two violent tragedies that affect the life of pop star Celeste, played by both Raffey Cassidy and Natalie Portman. These violent tragedies occur when Celeste is 13 and 31. The first act of violence defines Celeste and shapes her career, her persona, her entire life. The second less directly impacts her, but is still a reflection of her career. Giving much more away would ruin the experience. This is a film best viewed with almost zero expectations or knowledge going in. Let the surprises, twists, and turns wash over you like a bubble-gum-sweet summer ballad that you find yourself mindlessly repeating on your commute home.

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Chicago ‘18 Review: ‘Friedkin Uncut’ Is An Inside Look at the White Boys’ Club of Hollywood

The first words we hear uttered by William Friedkin are, “To me, the two most interesting characters in the history of the world are Hitler and Jesus. There’s good and evil in everybody, that’s the truth that I believe.” Admittedly, this is a jarring way to begin a documentary. Friedkin then qualifies his statement by saying that Hitler was an example of a man who contained extremes, to make sure the audience doesn’t misconstrue his words. This controversial statement embodies the Friedkin we are shown in the documentary, Friedkin Uncut: he is a man who is fascinated by and tries to embody extremes.  

Friedkin Uncut is Francesco Zippel’s directorial debut and love song to director, William Friedkin, who brought us films such as The Exorcist, The French Connection, and Bug. This documentary premiered as part of Chicago International Film Festival’s programming, rather appropriately as Friedkin is a Chicago native. It is an expansive look at Friedkin’s work, his dedication to his craft, and the lengths he was willing to go to make something spectacular. From shooting the chase scene in The French Connection himself to even assisting with an exorcism, there’s no doubt that Friedkin always went to the extreme to create a film that no one had ever seen before. However, this documentary is also, perhaps subconsciously, an in-depth look at the rampant gender inequality in Hollywood.

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