‘The House with a Clock in Its Walls’ Fails to Create a World Worth Spending Any Time In

Considering his other film of 2018 was the abysmal and insensitive Death Wish remake, Eli Roth’s pivot to the child-oriented The House With A Clock In Its Walls (based on the young adult novel of the same name from Edward Gorey) may have taken quite a few people off guard. However, while I’ll admit the thought of him filming a horror story for kids had never crossed my mind until this announcement, it seemed like an area that Eli Roth may finally be able to shine in. Roth is well known for his over-the-top style of horror that can be interpreted either as enjoyable campy fun, or ridiculously stupid schlock depending on who you ask. Most of the time, I fall into the latter category but, just like a mother who keeps sending her deadbeat son checks in the mail, I always believed that Roth had a raw potential that was being wasted. The parts of Eli Roth’s style that I do enjoy always revolved around the obvious fun that he has on set, and the pure love he has for horror as a genre. What better place to explore that melodramatic dialogue and mess around with silly effects and scenarios than in a children’s horror film? Sure, he can’t be as bloody and insane as he is in all of his other movies, but the kitschy-ness of his style that usually comes across as messy or in poor taste would fit right in with a film all about an exuberant warlock and his larger-than-life house. This is what I wanted, what I hoped for, what I was really excited for. This is not what A House With a Clock In Its Walls gave me. Instead, what I got was a film that felt like the director himself had slept through it.

jkblk_house_header Continue reading “‘The House with a Clock in Its Walls’ Fails to Create a World Worth Spending Any Time In”

A Look Into The Okays and Not-So-Okays of Comic Book Movie Formulations in “Thor: Ragnarok”

lead_960
Rachel House as “Topaz” and Jeff Goldblum as “The Grandmaster” in Thor: Ragnarok. Photo by Jasin Boland. © Marvel Studios

No-one thinks that Thor movies are the best ones in the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Okay, maybe that was an exaggeration, but most people truly don’t. It is a quite widely known fact that among Marvel’s many branches of movies, TV shows and hundreds of characters, the 2011-built Asgardian universe of Thor movies is a middle tier for most of the viewers. Whether you look at them from an angle of criticism (with the former one having a 77% and the sequal having a 66% on Rotten Tomatoes, and both getting an 7 out of 10 in IMDb) or box office success, (The Dark World being tenth among Cinematic Universe with a growth of $644.6 and the original being the four-teenth with $449.3) the movies at best are mediocre stories that relied heavily on visual effects and at worst, nearly two hours long messes of unnecessary scale and so-called fun.

Continue reading “A Look Into The Okays and Not-So-Okays of Comic Book Movie Formulations in “Thor: Ragnarok””