Podcast #3: 2018 Wrap Up, 2019 Hopefuls

Third episode of the podcast is here!

On our Patreon page we set a goal of $75 to start working on our podcast and two months ago we hit that goal, thanks to your help! Every time we gain a new Patron, we come one step closer to saving enough money to pay to our writers. You can help us with as little as $1.

In our third episode podcast host Charlie Dykstal talks with our editor-in-chief Dilara Elbir, editor Mary Beth McAndrews and staff writer Mia Vİcino about their favourite films and performances of 2018 and what they are looking forward to in 2019. Available on iTunesSpotifyGoogle Play and Stitcher.

Happy awards season everyone!

Golden Globes Predictions

Here it is, the season we all hate to love and love to hate, the Awards Season! Predictions, staying up to watch awards, fighting our favourites until the Oscars when our exhaustion reaches its peak and we all go “I never want to live through another season again!” until the festivals hit and Here We Go Again! Critics circles already started naming their winners but the fun officially starts tonight with Golden Globes. Here at Much Ado we love our predictions so please enjoy reading the winners our hearts desire, and those we think will snatch the award!

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A Short Film Watchlist for FilmStruck Mourners

Like the rest of the Internet, we here at Much Ado About Cinema are mourning the tragic loss of streaming service FilmStruck. Yesterday morning, Warner Bros. gave the beloved site a terminal diagnosis, with the plug officially being pulled on November 29. This means we only have about a month to cram as many Criterions into our cinephilic eyeballs as possible.

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‘Madeline’s Madeline’ Expertly Blurs the Line Between Performance Art and Reality

Madeline’s Madeline is unafraid to delve into the volatile psyche of a teenage artist. Art is so often used as a tool to sort through perplexing emotions, so it makes sense that struggling teens tend to lose themselves in this low-cost form of therapy. This semi-experimental fever dream poses the question: At what point in the creative process does art as personal self-expression begin to do more harm than good?

Madeline (newcomer Helena Howard) is a 16-year-old actress in a physical theater troupe, fresh out of a brief stay in a psychiatric ward. Her teacher Evangeline (Molly Parker) is at once forceful and understanding, as if Fletcher from Whiplash actually had a heart. On the flip side is Madeline’s mother Regina (Miranda July), an unstable but ultimately loving helicopter parent whose moods, like Madeline’s, violently change at the blink of an eye. From a more neutral perspective, Regina’s actions may come across as a frustrated, terrified mom doing her best to make sure her daughter stays healthy. But the eyes of a teenage girl, especially one with mental illness, see the world through a distorted lens. I know this because I once was one.

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‘Proud Mary’ is an Action Film Without the Action

This review is by our guest writer Mia Vicino.

Starting out strong with a funky opening credit sequence set to “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone,” a nod to blaxploitation films of the 70s, Proud Mary appeared to be steeped in potential. As the titular Mary, a hit woman for a powerful Boston crime family, checks out her personal arsenal of sleek guns with her steely stare, we sense we’re in for a wild ride of firefights and ass-kicking by the one-and-only Taraji P. Henson. Sadly, this is not the movie we get.

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Taraji P. Henson in Proud Mary. Photo by Dana Starbard © 2017 CTMG, Inc.

Instead, Proud Mary is loosely based on the plot of the 1980 John Cassavetes crime drama Gloria starring Gena Rowlands. After a hit goes awry, Mary finds herself responsible for a young boy named Danny (Jahi Di’Allo Winston). Juggling both childcare and an assassination profession is a ripe set-up for some comedic scenes, such as Mary taking Danny to a hot dog cart near her mark’s apartment so she can surreptitiously scope out the area.

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