The Critics Interviews: Ty Burr

The Critics Interviews is a Much Ado series in which we interview film and cultural critics about the industry, social media, responsibilities of a critic and their advice for young writers.

Our second interview is with Ty Burr, author and film critic for The Boston Globe. Enjoy!

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Films Directed by Women in 2017 that You Might’ve Missed (Part 1)


2017 was a year full of the celebration of female filmmakers. Patty Jenkins brought Wonder Woman to the big screen and proved to those still in doubt that women can make blockbusters! (Wow, can you believe?!) Dee ReesMudbound and Greta Gerwig‘s Lady Bird were nominated for Academy Awards! So to celebrate female filmmakers and Women’s History Month we’ll share with you some films that were directed by women that you might’ve missed. To not overwhelm you with all these great films, we’ll share them throughout the month! In honour of International Women’s Day, here is the first piece, we hope you enjoy and watch them all!

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The Critics Interviews: Hunter Harris

Here at Much Ado, as young and emerging critics, we are not only interested in writing our own criticism, but we’re also interested in critics, the job itself and the industry as a whole. Which is why I’m proud to announce we’re starting a new series called “The Critics Interviews” in which we will, as the name suggests, interview film, culture and industry critics. Our first interview is with one of the Much Ado team’s favourites, Vulture’s wonderful Hunter Harris. Enjoy!

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Most Anticipated Films of 2018


2017 was a crazy, whirlwind of a year for cinema, with great films that left us on the edge of our seats like Get Out and Dunkirk, but now it’s time to start thinking about the countless films we can’t wait to see in 2018. Especially as the 2018 Sundance Festival comes to an end, we can’t help to think 2018 could be another great year for film. Ranging from small, independent films to major Disney blockbusters, here are some of the films our staff desperately anticipating.

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How To Survive Award Season Without Really Trying

Saoirse Ronan and Greta Gerwig on set of ‘Lady Bird’. © A24

Oh the mighty Award Season! In the second half of every year, fans of cinema everywhere, long forgotten their sufferings in the first half, start to say: “I wish Award Season was here already!”. And then before we know it, it’s here! Oh no… Our favourites are losing. Everyone is angry at each other. Non-Americans are staying up all night to watch red carpets just to see their favourites for 5 seconds then to suffer through bad jokes in award shows themselves. And then before you know it 2-3 awards have passed, three weeks till next one. “We needed a break.” says the fans of cinema, oh no they forgot their suffering and ask “It’s been a week c’mon when’s the next one?!” and the circle of life keeps going until the Oscars. Everyone is exhausted by then, friendships are torn, predictions are off the roof! And then, whoever wins wins. Everyone goes to bed and sleeps off the season exhaustion for 14 hours, wakes up next morning saying: “Did I dream that or did Annette Benning’s husband actually announced Best Picture wrong?”

Well don’t worry, Much Ado is here to give you a little bit of help in this award season of surprises. Here are eight films from some of this season’s best nominees to help you pass the time and help with withdrawals!

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Black Mirror Review: Arkangel – Oh no, parents!


When I sat down to watch Arkangel, I had an advantage (but also disadvantage) that our other writers didn’t have: I have almost never seen a Black Mirror episode. The only episode I’d ever seen was Be Right Back from the second season. My advantage was that I could judge the episode on its own without comparison to previous ones, but the disadvantage was that I didn’t know how and where the episode stands in the grand universe of Black Mirror (I made up for this by binge-watching the rest). I chose Arkangel as my first episode to start binge-watching the series because I find helicopter parenting such an interesting subject, and an episode directed by Jodie Foster, the first female director of the series, seemed like a great choice.

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2017: A Television Year in Review

Here at Much Ado About Cinema, the focus tends to be on films – which is great, but that’s not all cinema amounts to. 2017 was also a great year for television, and there’s a lot of arguments to be made concerning the prestige of the format; with the popularity of netflix and the prominence of many highly-regarded directors flocking to the small screen, television is experiencing something of a resurgence in reputability. With this in mind, Much Ado will be incorporating more coverage of the medium as we head into 2018, and we thought we would begin with a look back on our favourite shows of 2017, from the surprising, to the disappointing, to the consistently brilliant.


American Gods

American Gods. © 2017 Fremantle Media North America

To most, American Gods might seem no different than many other fantasy series that are on cable TV, or even the network: it has cool visuals, is based on a book series, and written in hopes of captivating its viewers via carefully crafted plot twists. Built on the already complex premise of Neil Gaiman’s book of the same name, creator Bryan Fuller and his team of writers manage to succesfully carry a transition between two mediums of storytelling by doing that one wouldn’t expect from such a genre, and focusing on the people that  fantasy world rather than what makes the world a fantasy one. Of course, the fact that people are mostly the main reason that this world is magic does provide help on this subject to them, but even the visual work here is always about what it tells of instead of what it might show. Fuller might be best known for his visual perfection of Hannibal, but his work here can be even argued to exceed that. Eight episodes, each not longer than an hour, work as book chapters of their own — and they all have their own prologues in most cases, little, thematically coherent cold openings that tell smaller stories with little to no consequence, but are still able to create an impactful parallel with the bigger picture. When looked from afar, American Gods is a masterpiece of filmmaking and production — and that might even be enough for it to be considered as one of the best outings of the year: but the real present opens itself up when one begins to examine the work closely, and finds themselves in a labyrinth of significant questions abot love, life, belief and fate.

– Deniz Çakır

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