‘First Man’ is a Space Movie that Stays Grounded

Most movies about space are mammoth beasts. They’re epic, vast, an attempt to capture as much of the endless void as the lens can handle. It’s surprising then that for a film of this scale, it wouldn’t be entirely inaccurate to call First Man a small movie. We’ve always looked at the moon landing as a momentous achievement for humanity, but fail to look at the humans who made it possible. Damien Chazelle, in his follow-up to almost best picture winner La La Land, corrects this and then some – First Man is an immersive, exhausting ride, on a physical and emotional level.

firstman1

Continue reading “‘First Man’ is a Space Movie that Stays Grounded”

An Ode to Brie Larson’s ‘Unicorn Store’

Unicorn Store is stuck in limbo. One year ago today, Brie Larson’s directorial debut premiered at Toronto to the excitement of many, only to receive an indifferent shrug in response. As a result, it has yet to be picked up for distribution, and likely never will. The film stars Larson as Kit, an art school dropout in stasis. Unable, or unwilling, to grow up, she still lives with her parents and shares the same obsessions as most six-year-old girls – the colour pink, sparkles, and glitter – she’s arts and crafts gone wild. Before she resigns herself to the monotony of adulthood, Samuel L. Jackson appears like a fairy godfather with the fashion sense of Jeff Goldblum and the promise of what she wants most: A unicorn. I caught Unicorn Store at Edinburgh Film Festival (its second and probably last festival stop), and to my surprise, I fell in love fast. I laughed a lot, but I also cried – the film’s sweet sentimentality wraps around you like a blanket. It’s also a smarter film than it lets on. While it understands the comedic possibilities of a 20-something who believes in unicorns, it never treats Kit like a joke – the script maintains a subversively sharp wit. 

2a66127f8eb4164e8cd397f6473c6727

Continue reading “An Ode to Brie Larson’s ‘Unicorn Store’”

‘To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before’ is an Irresistibly Charming Rom-Com

To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before is the epitome of unattainable teenage fantasies, treading knee-deep in the most recognisable of rom-com cliches that it threatens to give you a cavity or two. But of course director Susan Johnson knows that. When we meet our romantically hopeless hero Lara Jean (Lana Condor), she’s running in a luscious field in a flowing regal gown to meet the boy of her affections, Josh (Israel Broussard). One problem: Josh is dating her sister, Margot (Janel Parrish), and is ceremoniously dumped when she heads to Scotland for university. (I, a Scottish person, have qualms but that’s for another time.) The opening is like something straight out of a sappy romance novel – because it is. Lara Jean is a classic hopeless romantic, with a tendency to daydream about falling in love instead of experiencing it herself, drawing on love stories and John Hughes movies for inspiration. The film similarly wears its influences on its sleeve, likely making a new generation of teens succumb to the never-ceasing power of the rom-com.

to all the boys2
Noah Centineo and Lana Condor in ‘To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before’ © Netflix

Continue reading “‘To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before’ is an Irresistibly Charming Rom-Com”

‘The Meg’ Lacks the Thrills to Stay Afloat

Let’s just get this out of the way: The Meg is a bad movie. I’m as disappointed as you are! It’s Jason Statham going head-to-fin against a giant fucking shark – evenly matched foes in a face-off so momentous, so legendary, it’s worthy of scripture. Have I put too much faith in this? Definitely. But shark movies are supposed to be fun. They carve out a space for you to leave reality at the door and revel in its (lovable) stupidity. Director Jon Turtletaub must’ve forgotten about this, for The Meg is too serious for its own good.

themeg3
Li Bingbing and Jason Statham in ‘The Meg’

Continue reading “‘The Meg’ Lacks the Thrills to Stay Afloat”

EIFF 2018 Review: ‘Piercing’ is Fifty Shades of Grey for Sadists

Have you ever planned out a conversation in your head, just for it to go completely off the rails when it happens? No matter how terrible things have gone for you, Reed (Christopher Abbott) probably has it worse. Instead of a conversation, he has a murder mapped out. With all intricately designed plans, one wrong step can be the catalyst for catastrophe, and in Piercing, that catalyst is prostitute-turned-victim Jackie (Mia Wasikowska) who instigates a blood-splattered catastrophe with equal amounts of stabbing and sexual tension. A psychosexual romp gone wrong (or right depending on how kinky you are), Nicolas Pesce’s follow-up to The Eyes of My Mother is a bold leap from his haunting debut that doesn’t quite stick the landing.

piercing
Mia Wasikowska and Christopher Abbott in ‘Piercing’

Continue reading “EIFF 2018 Review: ‘Piercing’ is Fifty Shades of Grey for Sadists”

EIFF 2018 Review: John Cho is ‘Searching’ for Answers in the Macbook-set Mystery

Though Searching is thrillingly innovative with the way it uses the computer screen as a storytelling device, it cannot claim to be the first. That title goes to the horror film Unfriended (and by association its sequel coming next month). Perhaps no movie gimmick has earned more scoffs than the one Unfriended started. Imagine the grumbles of retrograde purists everywhere: kids these days are addicted to their computers, and now it has infiltrated into our cinemas yadda yadda yadda. While the computer screen format grew thin for producing jump scares, it may have found its niche in Searching as a tool for investigation.

searching2
John Cho in ‘Searching’ © Sony Pictures

Continue reading “EIFF 2018 Review: John Cho is ‘Searching’ for Answers in the Macbook-set Mystery”

Edinburgh International Film Festival Preview

EIFF may not be the biggest event on everyone’s calendars but it’s the world’s longest continually-running film festival. For the next 2 weeks, Scotland’s capital will play host to British world premieres, festival circuit favourites, and plenty of smaller films looking to find distribution. Two of our writers, Iana and Hannah, are attending this year and highlight a few of the films they are excited to see from this year’s eclectic programme.

Continue reading “Edinburgh International Film Festival Preview”